Joint Problems
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Joint Problems

Found [31] Articles :: Page 1 of 3

Kneecap Knocks Can Be Hard on Your Small Dog

It's a scenario familiar to many pet owners - your dog is running across the yard chasing a ball or Frisbee, when in mid-stride he yelps in pain and yanks a hind leg off the ground. Moments later he's off again, but sporting a limp which goes away after 10 to 20 minutes.What your dog likely experienced here is a luxated patella, or in layman's terms, a dislocated kneecap. In a normal knee, the patella fits into a groove at the end of the femur (thigh bone), and slides up and down as the knee joint bends back and forth. It also acts as a protective cover for the knee joint. The joint's movement follows a limited track, guided by the grooves in the femur. [...]

Hip Dysplasia a Crippling Ailment for Many Large-Breed Dogs

Another of the common joint ailments that affect dogs, hip dysplasia is a disorder that is widely misunderstood. As with all human types of arthritis, some information is known, but many factors about the problem aren't yet fully understood.In normal, healthy dogs, the hip joint attaches the hind leg to the body, and consists of a ball-and-socket construction. The ball portion is located at the head of the femur, or thigh bone, while the socket is attached to the pelvis. In a normal joint, the ball rotates freely within the socket, and the spot where the two bones actually connect (the articular surface), is cushioned by spongy cartilage. The bones also are held together with a ligament and the joint capsule, a strong band of connective tissue which surrounds the dog's two leg bones, adding stability. [...]

Back Pain, Leg Weakness Signs of Nerve-Related Syndrome

Lumbar-sacral syndrome occurs when the nerve roots and spinal cord are compressed at the point where they pass through the lumbar-sacram portion of the lower spine, near the hips. The disease is also known as "cauda equine" syndrome.This disorder can be inherited (congenital), meaning it is present at birth, or it also can be developed after birth. It can appear at any age and in both males and females, and is common in dogs that have been struck by an automobile. Large-breed dogs are affected more often than smaller breeds, and the syndrome is seen most often in German Shepherds. Dogs that are severely overweight also can develop the condition. [...]

Torn Ligaments Affect Animals as Well as Humans

Mention torn ligaments and most people are more likely to think of athletes than animals. However, this problem also occurs in many pets and livestock. In fact, one of the most common knee injuries in dogs is known as a ruptured cruciate ligament. [...]

Congenital Disorder Causes Front Leg Deformity in Dogs

One of the more heartbreaking genetic diseases found in the canine world is a condition known alternatively as chondrodysplasia, achondroplasia or chondrodystrophy. Characterized by crippling deformities and abnormally shaped limbs, the disease causes the cartilage cushioning the joints to become deformed and the bones attached to that cartilage to grow abnormally.The condition is transmitted through a recessive gene. When two carriers of this recessive gene are bred, the resulting animals frequently are born with the disease. Chondrodysplasia also typically occurs in connection with other serious medical problems, including deafness, dwarfism and abnormally shortened life spans. It has a wide range of severity. For example, in dogs whose front legs are affected, the dog may appear nearly normal, or else have front legs that are only slightly bowed. In extreme cases, however, the animal will be crippled due to severely deformed limbs. [...]

Aging Takes Its Toll in the Form of Joint Disease

Aging takes it toll on everyone, animals as well as humans. Among the hardest hit are the joints, especially the articular cartilage inside those joints, which normally provides a smooth, low-friction buffer between the bones. A variety of causes, including age, can cause this cartilage to break down or develop fissures, resulting in severe pain, inflammation, and lameness.Although degenerative joint disease (and the resulting arthritis) is generally considered a problem of older canines, it's appearing in more and more younger large-breed dogs as well. Selective breeding has resulted in the altering of bone structure in several breeds, especially larger dogs such as German Shepherds, Great Danes and Mastiffs. In these animals, many are now born with a defect that prevents the development of normal cartilage, leading to permanent early lameness in the shoulders, knees, and ankles. [...]

Elbow Dysplasia a Key Cause of Canine Arthritis

Humans have their tennis elbow, but they don't have a corner on the market. Dogs also are prone to an inherited disease called elbow dysplasia.. Both elbows are normally affected, but the condition also can affect just one limb.Elbow dysplasia describes a type of damage within the elbow joint, often resulting in severe arthritis. Some dogs will display only a slight limp or an otherwise abnormal gait; others will end up virtually crippled by the pain. Dogs in the early stages of the disorder often hold their elbows outward or stand with their feet rotated outward. Or, they may shuffle their feet excessively and flip their front feet outward as they walk. Some are notable only by the dog spending an inordinate amount of time sitting or lying down, keeping weight off of its feet. [...]

Panosteitis

Panosteitis is a canine disease about which very little is known. It seems to occur almost at random (although German Shepherds as a breed tend to produce the most cases) and has a tendency to vanish and return with seemingly little provocation. The disease manifests as a sudden lameness in one leg without any preceding trauma, strain, or any of the problems usually associated with lameness. Typically, it will appear first in one of the front legs and then without warning shift to another leg (leaving the initial area) with no predictable pattern.Because of the mysterious nature of the disease, it often either goes undiagnosed or is misdiagnosed. However, recent studies have shown that X-Rays will almost invariably reveal a greater than usual bone density in animals that carry the disease. [...]

Elbow Dysplasia: A Puzzling Condition For Vets And Owners

Elbow Dysplasia or ED is most often found in medium to large breeds of dogs and is most common in breeds such as the German Shepherd, Bernese Mountain Dog, Rottweiler, Retrievers and Chow Chows. Some of the medium sized breeds such as the Shetland Sheepdog and the Shar Pei also have high incidence of elbow dysplasia. Males are between 25 and 30% more likely to exhibit elbow dysplasia in the breeds that are prone to the condition. Elbow dysplasia can occur in one or both of the elbows and is particularly puzzling because not all dogs that have the condition will become lame and those that do become lame may have periods where the condition comes and goes at least in the early stages. [...]

Fragmented Medial Coronoid Process A Painful Elbow Problem

There are many different ways that a dog can injure his or her elbow or elbow joint, but one of the most challenging to diagnose without surgery or good x-rays is a condition known as fragmented medial coronoid process. In this situation, typically associated with breeds that have a problem with elbow dysplasia, a small piece of bone, often just a tiny chip, breaks off from the top of the ulna and lodges in the joint.The ulna is one of the two long bones found in the front leg below the elbow. As the largest joint of the two into the elbow, it often runs the greatest risk of becoming damaged or fractured, leading to chipping of the head of the ulna at the elbow joint. This can occur due to stress on the joint because of a dislocated elbow, problems with softening of the bones, or trauma or injury to the joint that causes splintering and fractures. [...]

Fractures Small Problems That Can Lead To Big Issues

Fractures are often one of the most difficult to diagnose or detect skeletal problems in dogs. Fractures are a result of any type of pressure or strain on the skeletal system, which may cause just a hairline fracture or slight crack through the bone or it may cause a complete break. Depending on the severity of the fracture and the location in which it occurs you may not notice any symptoms other than a slight favoring of the limb or area right up to a complete paralysis if the spinal cord is fractured or broken.Fractures can become more problematic as dogs age and mature, especially if the dog has other health conditions or metabolic problems that are preventing the proper development and maintenance of bones, joints and connective tissue. [...]

Medial Humeral Condyle

Osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle is one of the disorders that are caused by elbow dysplasia. Occuring mostly in larger breeds, this disorder affects one or both of the front legs. If diagnosed early, most dogs can go on to lead a very normal life. While most dogs that develop this disease because of genetics, other factors can lead to its development, including diet. In this article, we’ll discover what causes OCD of the medial humeral condyle, which breeds are predisposed to develop it, and available treatments. [...]

Hind Leg Paralysis In The Dachshund

Hind leg paralysis, commonly known as Dachshund paralysis is most common in the long backed breeds. The Dachshund has been bred for centuries to have a disproportionately long back with short little legs to support his or her weight on either end. This results in a huge problem for the long spine, especially close to the middle where there is little support and the bulk of the weight. For Dachshunds that are obese this problem can become even more pronounced, however even very fit Dachshunds can have this problem if they injure their back jumping up or down or twisting. [...]

Growing Pains In Large And Giant Breeds

Growing pains are normal in any type of mammal and occur where there are growth spurts or rapid development in the long bones of the skeleton. In dogs this is typically in the front leg or humerus bones or the hind leg tibia or femur bones. While some growing pains are to be expected, especially since the giant and large breeds of dogs mature and grow so rapidly, there are also several different conditions that can occur that are serious medical conditions and are not average growth related issues.One of the most common of these growing pain disorders is known as Panosteitis. This condition is noted by intermittent lameness in all the legs or just in the front or back legs, sometimes at different times or occasionally in all four legs at the same time. The greatest problem is that the condition will come and go, sometimes lasting only a few days or even up to two or more weeks. [...]

Screw-tailed Dogs And Hemivertebrae

Have you ever noticed how some breeds of dogs have a little cork screw or screw-tailed appearance? Often these dogs tend to be the short muzzled or brachycephalic breeds as well, and their short little kinky tails tend to balance out their short, pushed in faces.While the short little kinked tails may be cute in appearance, it is also an indicator of a deformation of the vertebrae of the spine, known as hemivertebrae. There are also some types of hemivertebrae or hemivertebra that can occur in other areas of the spine as well resulting in other malformations and movement problems. The breeds most likely to have hemivertebrae at the tail include Pugs, Boston Terriers and the English and French Bulldogs. The breeds that are most commonly seen with hemivertebrae in other areas of the spine include German Short Haired Pointers and the German Shepherd. [...]

Found [31] Articles :: Page 1 of 3
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