American Staffordshire Terrier, AmStaff
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American Staffordshire Terriers

Aliases: American Staffordshire Terrier, AmStaff

American Staffordshire Terriers For Sale

American Staffordshire Terrier

Ratings and Attributes

9 - 15 years.

4 - 8 puppies with the average being 6 puppies

Terrier, Terriers

CKC, FCI, AKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, ACR

Black/White, Red/White, Fawn/White, Blue/White, and even Brindle/White.

Short

Large

Moderate Shed

17-19 inches (43-48 cm.)

57-67 pounds (25-30 kg.)

16-18 inches (41-46 cm.)

57-67 pounds (25-30 kg.)

Like many other breeds, the American Staffordshire Terrier will be quite content with apartment or small house living so long as they get enough exercise. Even if you don't have a yard, this breed will be happy, as they can be active indoors and keep their fitness levels up. Because of their thinner coat and sensitive skin, it's best that the American Staffordshire Terrier is kept in warmer climates in order to keep them comfortable.

Description

The stocky and muscular look of the American Staffordshire Terrier makes this particular dog breed not only impressive, but also slightly intimidating to strangers and other dogs. The strength of this agile dog is apparent from the outer appearance. With a powerful and broad head structure, the short muzzle is accentuated by a strong set jawbone. The ears of the American Staffordshire Terrier are often short and cropped.

Like its cousin the American Pitt Bull Terrier, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a tough looking dog, but the American Staffordshire Terrier is often the larger of the two with a thicker bone structure, weight, and overall head size. The teeth are set in a scissors bite. The coat of this breed is short and shiny, making it simple to take care of for a wide range of owners.

The eyes of the American Staffordshire Terrier are black and round, with a stern expression that can be perceived as both intimidating and alert. However, with a closer look, the American Staffordshire Terrier seems to be more of a lover than a fighter. Affectionate and loving, this dog breed works well in a family setting and can be a powerful guard dog if necessary.

American Staffordshire Terriers Puppies

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Coat Description

The coat of the American Staffordshire Terrier is short and glossy, creating a vibrant shine when well managed. It can come in a variety of colors (as listed below) and is easy to maintain. Those that do not want to spend hours managing their dog's coat will find that this dog is that perfect fit for their time. The coat does appear dense, but it is not well-suited for temperature extremes, especially the cold.

History

The American Staffordshire Terrier originated in the 19th century in the Staffordshire region of England as a mixing of the bulldog and other terrier breeds. In this breeding process, the American version became the larger and more muscular version of the bulldog terrier.

Once dog fighting was banned in the United States in the early 1900s, two versions of the American Staffordshire Terrier emerged - one for show and one for fighting. The fighting one is now considered to be the American Pit Bull Terrier, while the American Staffordshire Terrier is considered the gentler show version.

Temperament

With its powerful stance, it's no wonder that the American Staffordshire Terrier is a natural guard dog. This is a dog breed that naturally will want to protect its family and anyone it deems a part of its pack. The pack mentality in this particular breed is strong, so once you've asserted that you are a part of their pack, they will fiercely protect you.

When they feel they are threatened, these are dogs that will become aggressive and even bite the intruder. Unlike other breeds, the American Staffordshire Terrier will also actively protect their owner's property too. This is an excellent combination for those that want that extra layer of protection for their home.

What's more is that the American Staffordshire Terrier is a persistent fighter that will continue to fight until they feel the attacker or intruder is subdued. This tenacity is helpful in dangerous situations can be problematic if they aren't taught properly who is friend and who is foe. These lessons will need to begin as quickly as possible including socialization with other pets and children that are in the home. Once this dog learns who their 'family' is, they will be docile and loving. This breed has actually been bred to be a family dog over the years. So while you should never leave a dog alone with a young child, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a good breed for all ages.

If a dog is left unsocialized, it might have troubles interacting with other dogs. When the American Staffordshire Terrier feels it is being backed into a corner (whether figuratively or literally), it can lash out and become aggressive.

Stable and outgoing, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a breed that will be fun to have around the house. They want to do nothing but please their master, so they will be willing to do whatever it takes to make you happy.

However, that said, it should also be noted that the American Staffordshire Terrier is a dog that can be difficult to housetrain. You will need to spend extra time with these lessons to ensure this dog doesn't create a bathroom of your home's interior.

Another thing to consider is that while this dog is a loving breed to have in a family setting, it does not do well with an owner that is not willing to assert their authority. The American Staffordshire Terrier takes the idea of pack order very seriously, so you will need to find ways to show that you are in charge of it in order to receive respect in return.

Health Problems

In most cases, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a hardy breed that doesn't suffer from a lot of Health Problems, but there are some concerns that do come up with some dogs:

  • hip dysplasia: A common disorder in canines, this degenerative disease causes the hip joint to become damaged, causing pain and problems with mobility. Symptoms occur over a long period of time and can manifest in symptoms such as slower movement and problems getting up and down. Treatment options will vary, but include exercises, pain medications, and even surgery.

  • Congenital Heart disease - Some American Staffordshire Terrier dogs are born with this condition and symptoms and treatments vary. Many dogs have no problems at all, while others will require monitoring and medications to make sure the heart is working properly.

  • Cataracts - Caused by genetic factors, these Cataracts can cause blindness and vision disturbances. Treatments are available for severe cases and require surgery to remove the Cataracts.

  • Hives - Since the coat of the American Staffordshire Terrier is so short, the skin is often exposed to the elements and the outside environment. This often creates a situation in which the skin can become irritated more easily by insects or heat, even stress, causing hives or small welts in the skin.
  • Grooming

    The American Staffordshire Terrier has such a short coat that they often don't need a lot of maintenance for their appearance. Brushing with a coarse bristle brush on a regular basis is recommended. In addition, try to use dry shampoo to keep up the appearance of the coat and bathe only when absolutely necessary. Whenever your dog has gotten into something dirty or smelly, go ahead and give them a full bath.

    To really make their fur shine, you can use a clean car chamois on the surface. Moving this rag over the fur gives it a glossy sheen that will help your dog look healthy.

    Note that brushing will help keep your American Staffordshire Terrier from shedding in your living area. Though an average shedder, regular maintenance of the fur will allow you to minimize the effects of loose and shedding hairs.

    When you are brushing or bathing your American Staffordshire Terrier, be sure to examine the skin for any irritations that may indicate bacterial infections. Cuts and bumps that you do not recognize might be indicating something more serious than a superficial wound or sore. Check with your vet if you notice sores oozing or getting infected, as well as if you notice anything that seems to be spreading on their skin. Often, it will just be a case of hives, but it never hurts to double check.

    If you have bathed your dog, but then you notice that they smell worse after the bath, you might want to talk to your vet as well. The vet will check the dog's nose and mouth to be sure that nothing else is happening. Sometimes, a change in smell can be a sign of a systemic infection, so having your dog looked at by a vet can help to put your mind at rest.

    Exercise

    The American Staffordshire Terrier does require regular exercise in order to be healthy and happy. You will want to take this dog on frequent walks and keep them occupied with toys and other distractions. Owners that take their American Staffordshire Terrier out for an hour of walking each day report that their dogs are more content and don't become bored or fidgety when they are then brought back indoors.

    Since this is an intelligent dog, it may be a good idea to take the American Staffordshire Terrier to regular obedience classes to help them stay active as well as learn lessons of how to interact with others.

    Training

    The most important thing to realize about the American Staffordshire Terrier is that it bases its world on the idea of a pack order. This means that it believes that someone is going to be the leader of its life, whether that distinction is theirs or it is their owners, this is the result of training. Making sure the American Staffordshire Terrier is trained early to know that you are the authority can be a challenging task for any owner. But if you're someone that doesn't like to assert authority, it will be especially tricky, if not impossible to control this sort of breed.

    You will need to constantly remind the American Staffordshire Terrier that they are not the ones in charge and that you are. This will take consistent discipline and commands to help monitor their progress along the way. Many owners find that some assistance in an obedience class setting can help them get this training started, but since the dog will be in your care for most of the time, you need to be willing and able to keep up the lessons.

    While the American Staffordshire Terrier doesn't necessarily need to be attended to at every moment, this is a breed that likes to interact with its master. This might include tasks in which they can do something that will please you - i.e. fetching and pulling on a chew toy. You want to give this dog a lot of praise when you are training it, so that it knows it is pleasing you. This is the best way to approach training with this particular breed as negative training can often cause the dog to become upset or even defensive. However, if the American Staffordshire Terrier does do something it's not supposed to, you will need to be firm to assert your authority and ensure that the action does not happen again.

    Though they have a reputation for being guard dogs, some of their skills will have to come from you. For example, the American Staffordshire Terrier will not naturally bark at the door or at strangers, so you may need to teach them to do this, if this is a behavior you want encouraged.

    You will also need to realize that even if you aren't overtly trying to tell your American Staffordshire Terrier something, they can often pick up on subtle cues in your behavior. For example, if you're not firm in your training, they will not be consistent in their resulting behaviors.

    A American Staffordshire Terrier that is not trained well will often bark excessively, become aggressive and overly dominant, as well as have troubles with urinating.

    House training is of particular concern with this intelligent breed. If their owner is not firm about what is acceptable and what is not acceptable, you can create a situation in which the dog is urinating or defecating all over the house. It will help you to be firm with the dog right from the beginning in terms of what you expect for house training. You may also want to take classes in obedience training in this area prior to your dog's arrival in your home.

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