Deutsch Drahthaar, Deutscher Drahthaariger, Vorstehhund Drahthaar
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German Wirehaired Pointers

Aliases: Deutsch Drahthaar, Deutscher Drahthaariger, Vorstehhund Drahthaar

German Wirehaired Pointer For Sale

German Wirehaired Pointer

Ratings and Attributes

8 and 10 years.

6 and 10 puppies.

Gun Dog, Sporting Dog

CKC, FCI, AKC, UKC, ANKC, NKC, NZKC, APRI, ACR

The colors of the German Wirehaired Pointer are liver and white, black and white, and solid liver.

Short

Large

Moderate Shed

24-26 inches

60-70 pounds

22 inches

60-70 pounds

The German Wirehaired Pointer is best suited in a home with a large fenced yard. They do very poorly in apartment style living. They get extreme indoor restlessness and need to spend a large quantity of time outside. They are known to become very high strung and active indoors. In order to prevent this extreme indoor restlessness they need plenty of outdoor exercise.

Description

The German Wirehaired Pointer is a very distinctive, muscular medium sized dog. This breed's most distinctive feature is its wiry weather resistant coat and its facial furnishings. The head is moderately long with brown eyes that are overhung with medium length eyebrows. The ears are rounded and hang close to the head. The ears are not to be broad. The muzzle is to be fairly long with a straight nasal bone. The nose is to be brown with large open nostrils.

The neck of the dog is medium length and slightly arched. The skin is to be tight to be the body. The ribs are well sprung and the chest is deep. The back should be short, straight, and strong. The hips are broad with a nicely rounded croup. The tail is set high and should be carried horizontal or above when the dog is alert. The tail is docked about two-fifths of its original length.

The leg bones are flat not round and strong. They cannot be too heavy that the dog's agility is impeded. The feet are webbed, arched high with thick pads and hard strong nails. The dewclaws are generally removed. The thighs are strong and muscular. The hind legs are parallel when viewed from the back. The hocks are short and straight.

The gait of the German Wirehaired Pointer is free and smooth. It should have sufficient reach in the forequarters with substantial power in the hindquarters. It is considered to be a moderate gait. The dog has a strong ground covering stride and keeps a firm back. The legs move in a straight line and there is no tendency for the legs to cross over or interfere.

German Wirehaired Pointer Puppies

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Coat Description

The coat of the German Wirehaired Pointer is its most distinctive feature. The coat is weather resistant and somewhat water repellant. The undercoat is dense enough that in winter it can keep the dog warm but thin enough that in summer it is virtually invisible. The outer coat is straight, wiry, and flat lying and is about 1-2 inches in length. The eyebrows are of strong straight hair and the beard and whiskers are of medium length.

History

The German Wirehaired Pointer was developed in the late 19th Century and beginning of the 20th Century in Germany. The breeding origin is based on the ideas of "Hegewald" (Sigismund Freiherr von Zedlitz und Neukirch). It was carefully cross bred from the German Pointer and several other breeds. There is some differentiation on which breeds these were. It is speculated that they were Wirehaired Griffon, Poodle-Pointer, Foxhound, and Bloodhound. The German Wirehaired Pointer is the most popular dog in its country of origin, Germany. However, it was not officially recognized until the 1920's. At this time the dog was introduced to the United States. It was officially recognized in the United States in 1959. It has never grown to be as popular in the United States as it is in Germany.

Temperament

The German Wirehaired Pointer is a very intelligent, active, and affection breed. They like to keep busy and enjoy doing work for their owners. Without enough exercise of activity they can become very bored and hard to manage. It is important to keep them busy with tasks or involved in activities outdoors.

This breed's puppies are very high energy and are very rambunctious. It is necessary to note that they are late bloomers and do not fully mature until two years old. They typically will excessively bark or destructively chew when they are bored or restless. This can be very aggravating for the owners. In addition to this, the German Wirehaired Pointer exhibit strong separation anxiety and do not like to be left alone for more than a few hours. If you work long hours or are away from home frequently, this is not the dog for you. Another thing to be aware of if choosing a puppy from this breed is that they do not house train easily. It takes several months of consistent and firm training for them to pick it up.

They are very loyal family pets. However, they can become jealous. They make excellent watch dogs and are very protective of their owners. If the family has children, this dog may not be the best choice. This breed typically does better with older and considerate children. They are affectionate and loving towards their owners and remain very loyal. They can be dominant with other dogs and animals, but generally will do alright. They typically do well with other household animals, however, will tend to be dominant with other dogs in their homes.

They need to be socialized from a young age because they tend to be a little bit aloof with strangers. Aloofness can turn into shyness which can be hard to handle when they are adult dogs. They do become attached to their owners and show tendencies of jealousy and these needs to be watched for. Early socialization can prevent or minimize this because it can show the dog that people and attention from other sources is not a threat.

The German Wirehaired Pointer make great hunting companions. They are capable of hunting any kind of game on any kind of terrain. This breed is an excellent tracker with a strong nose. They can also track and retrieve on both land and water. They are steady, lively, and vigorous and this adds to their great hunting appeal because they do not tire easily. However, if being used for hunting and retrieving out in the brush and water it is necessary to make sure that their feet are checked afterwards to watch for debris.

Health Problems

  • hip dysplasia: Ball and joint problem of the hip. Causes arthritic like symptoms.

  • Entropion: The eyelid will roll inwards towards the eye and cause irritation of the cornea. Surgical repair is required.

  • Cataracts: Causes visual blurring and can eventually cause blindness.

  • von Willebrands Disease: Involves a problem with the clotting of the blood.
  • Grooming

    Grooming for the German Wirehaired Pointer is rated as being moderately low. They do shed and therefore require twice weekly brushing with a firm bristle brush. They do require some stripping and hand plucking during the shedding seasons. This breed of dog is considered to be an average shedder. The coat should feel rough to the touch. The coat does require bathing when necessary.

    Bathing should only be done when necessary. Their coat is very weather resistant and is somewhat waterproof which makes bathing not as regular as with some other breeds. When bathing a specialty dog shampoo should be used as human shampoo or liquid soap can be very irritating to the skin of the dog. Hand plucking of the hair should be done during the bath as it can reduce the amount of shed. This is especially crucial during the two shedding seasons in the year. The dog is medium sized and so bathing at home in the tub should be sufficient. If you find it is too difficult to handle, professional bathing and grooming is an option. This can be done two or three times a year.

    If the dog spends a lot of time in the bush or rough terrain it is important for the ears and bottoms of the feet to be checked. Ears can get clogged with dirt and debris. This collection of dirt or debris can cause ear canal infections and other ear problems. The ears should be cleaned regularly. The bottoms of the feet should always be cleaned regularly. If the dog spend a lot of time in rough terrain dirt and debris or cuts may appear on the bottoms of the feet and this can be very uncomfortable for the dog.

    Like with every other breed of dog, regular grooming will keep the dog happy and healthy. Regular maintenance of the nails, teeth, and eyes are also necessary. When cutting the nails it is essential to make sure that you do not cut the quick. This can be very painful and will result in bleeding.

    Exercise

    The German Wirehaired Pointer is a very high energy dog with a tireless nature. They need excessive amounts of exercise in order to not become bored and restless. They will become restless indoors and this can be bothersome. They are best suited for an owner or family who love the outdoors and can dedicate the time to running and keeping the dog occupied. This breed loves to go jogging, swim, and retrieve. This makes them an excellent dog for a family who loves to go to the lake or lives near the water.

    They were originally bred for the purpose of hunting and are still used for that purpose today. They will make wonderful companions for game hunters. Hunting will keep the dog feeling physically and mentally stimulated and will reduce the amount of indoor restlessness.

    Training

    Training for the German Wirehaired Pointer is essential. They need very consistent and firm training from the time they are young puppies. One of the most difficult parts of training for this breed is house breaking. The two keys to housebreaking are confinement and regular access to the right place to go to the bathroom. Confinement means that until your dog is house broken they are not allowed to roam freely around the house. The dog should be confined when ever you are not playing, grooming, walking, cuddling, or occupying the dog in any other way. If the dog is allowed to roam free around the house and you are not watching they will go to the bathroom in the house and then the bad habit has started. There are three different types of confinement. First the dog can be put in a crate and let outside frequently. Secondly, the dog can be put in a pen with a litter box or newspapers. Lastly, the dog can be kept in a small room and they can have regular access outside through a doggie door. This way they can control when they go outside. Having access to the right place to go means take your dog outside. It is important that your dog has a place to go on a regular basis. This can be outside or it can also be newspaper or litter box at the beginning.

    Another essential element for the training of the German Wirehaired Pointer is socialization. The best socialization occurs between when the puppy is 7 weeks old until about 6 months old. That is the time to take the dog out into the world to experience new people and new places. This will help the dog become less aloof an suspicious. Socialization should continue throughout the dog's adolescent years because like teenagers the dog's attitude can change monthly or even daily. It is important to keep introducing your dog to new things. Adult socialization is almost impossible because by that time the dog has already determined its personality and attitudes. It can be very difficult to try and change that during adulthood.

    The German Wirehaired Pointer because it is a sporting and hunting dog can also receive training for that purpose. There are several agencies and training programs to assist in the training of both the dog and owner. They will excel in agility, hunting, tracking, and retrieving. Getting the dog involved in agility training is a great way to occupy the dog both mentally and physically.

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